© 2019 Malcolm French

WELCOME to Eucalypts of Western Australia

With approximately 550 different eucalypt species and subspecies known to occur in Western Australia (WA) including the corymb’s (bloodwoods) and with the potential for new species still to be discovered, researching and hunting the eucalypts in WA is a lot of fun.

It is not unusual when one goes out into the field to admire or wander through the woodlands here in WA you may find a new distribution extension for a species, which is pretty cool. For the trained eye this happens regularly, so therefore I can say with confidence, there is still much to do here in the world of eucalypts.

It is fantastic to see all the interest on our plants flowing through all the social media platforms these days, particularly on our eucalypts. Sometimes you hear negatives about our gum trees in often dropping leaves and bark, branches and generally messy; that’s true for a few, but for the majority, particularly here in WA where we have an incredibly diverse array of species with most of them ‘behaving’ in cultivation, adding enormously to our pleasure and general environment.

To enhance the awareness of WA’s eucalypts, Dean Nicolle and self have collaborated to produce a book on our eucalypts of the south-west of WA

WELCOME to Eucalypts of Western Australia

With approximately 550 different eucalypt species and subspecies known to occur in Western Australia (WA) including the genus Corymbia (bloodwoods) and with the potential for new species still to be discovered, researching and hunting the eucalypts in WA is a lot of fun.

It is not unusual when one goes out into the field to admire or wander through the woodlands here in WA you may find a new distribution extension for a species, which is pretty cool. For the trained eye this happens regularly in WA, so I can say with confidence, there is still much to do here in the world of eucalypts.

It is fantastic to see all the interest on our plants flowing through all the social media platforms these days, particularly on our eucalypts. Sometimes you hear negatives about our gum trees in often dropping leaves and bark, branches and generally messy; that’s true for a few, but for the majority, particularly here in WA where we have an amazing diverse array of species with most of them ‘behaving’ in cultivation, adding enormously to our pleasure and general environment.

Malcolm inspecting Eucalyptus beardiana, south of Shark Bay

NEW BOOK RELEASE

 

This book describes in detail all of the naturally occurring eucalypts (147 species and subspecies) in the large coastal and sub coastal regions from south of Dongara on the west coast to east of Ravensthorpe on the far south coast of Western Australia. 

The book incorporates Perth, the Swan coastal plain, the Darling, Stirling, Porongurup and Ravensthorpe Ranges, the Lesueur and Fitzgerald River National Parks (32 National Parks in total) and the mighty karri, jarrah, marri and tingle forest areas from Albany, Walpole, Pemberton to Margaret River.

This book covers the south-west area adjacent to Malcolm’s comprehensive book on the EUCALYPTS of WESTERN AUSTRALIA’s WHEATBELT.

24 species are described for the first time in a full book mode.

Additionally, a quick reference guide is provided to the flowering times of all 147 eucalypts has been included, which will be useful to apiarists, entomologists, bird enthusiasts and all growers of native plants.

Eucalyptus alatissima, from the Great Victoria Desert with pale yellow to pink and brilliant red flowers. A recently discovered new species with excellent ornamental potential in cultivation.